ALBERT EDWARD III

1901 - 1929
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The 1st Lifeboat at Clacton on Sea arrived by courtesy of the Great Eastern Railway which then only came as far as Weeley, Essex. Named the Albert Edward it was then taken to the new boathouse which was built on a site donated for the purpose at the junction of Carnarvon Road and Church Road. The Hon. Architect of the RNLI C.H.Cooke, Esq. F.R.S.,B.A., designed the boathouse. The boat supplied was 34 feet long and 8 feet 3 ins. of beam and rowed 10 oars double banked. The Ceremony of dedication was held on 10th July 1878 after the boat had been in service for a few months.

Services

(from The Lifeboat Journal)

1902 February 2nd, Steamship Dungonnel, of Glasgow, assisted to save 11 & vessel The Coastguard having informed the coxswain of the Lifeboat Albert Edward, on the morning of the 2nd February, that signals had been fired by the Swin Middle Light-vessel, he summoned the crew, and at 5.30 the Lifeboat was launched. On speaking to the light-vessel the coxswain was informed that the signals had been fired in answer to those of the Mouse Lightship, and the boat at once proceeded in that direction and found the s.s. Dungonell, of Glasgow, bound from Grangemouth for London, with coal, stranded on the Black Tail Spit. A whole gale was blowing from the East and the sea was very heavy. The Lifeboat men were engaged to jettison the cargo, and they continued to do so until 5pm, when the sea increased to such an extent that it became necessary to batten down the hatches. At 7 o’clock the engines were put astern, but before high water they were choked with sand, and the ship did not move with that tide. At 9.30 the jettisoning was again commenced, and continued until 4.30am, when one of the steamer’s boats was launched and took a line to a steam tug, by means of which a tow-line was brought to the vessel and made fast. At high water the tug succeeded in towing the vessel off the sand, and at once her anchor had to be let go so as to avoid collision with another vessel. The crew of the steamer, eleven in number, were so thoroughly exhausted that the Lifeboat men were requested by the captain to get in the anchor and the sixty fathoms of chain attached; this they did by manual labour, no steam power being available. The tug then towed the steamer in the direction of Gravesend, the coxswain of the Lifeboat accompanying her, and the boat returning to her station, which was reached at 3.15pm on the 3rd February, the s.s. Merlin, belonging to the General Steam Navigation Company, of London, kindly towing her part of the way. 1902 March 15th, Fishing ketch Cranina, of Brixham, saved vessel A severe north-westerly gale was experienced off Clacton on the morning of the 15th March accompanied by a rough sea. About 8.15am a vessel was seen drifting towards the Gunfleet Sands. Information was at once conveyed to the Lifeboat authorities, and the Assistant Honorary Secretary, on seeing the vessel was getting into a dangerous position, decided to launch the Lifeboat Albert Edward. This was done shortly after 9am, and on coming up with the vessel, she was found to be the ketch Crania, of Brixham, but no one was on board. The coxswain without delay, put some men on her, and sail having been set, a start was made to take her to Brightlingsea. On the way they fell in with the owner, who had come out in a smack, and he accepted the offer of the Coxswain to see the ketch into safety. As soon   as the ketch was under weigh the Lifeboat returned to her station; during the whole of the time she was afloat her behaviour evoked the greatest of praise, the local authorities speaking in the highest terms of her performance. 1902 July 1st, Brigantine Hilda, of Abo, stood by At 10.45am on the 1st July, a message was received from the Gunfleet Light House, stating that a barque was ashore about four and a half miles to the W.S.W. The signal to muster the Lifeboat crew was fired, and the Albert Edward Lifeboat at once proceeded to the ship, which proved to be the brigantine Hilda, of Abo, bound from London to Shields, in ballast. The wind and sea were moderate, so the captain declined any assistance, but asked that the Lifeboat should remain alongside until his vessel floated. This request was complied with, and on the vessel re-floating, apparently undamaged, no further help being required, the boat returned to her station. 1903 September 9th, Schooner Martha, of Rudkjobing, stood by In the early morning a message was received stating that a vessel was showing distress signals on the Maplin Sands. The crew of the Lifeboat Albert Edward were immediately summoned, and the boat proceeded to the position indicated. The vessel proved to be the schooner Martha, of Rudkjobing, bound for London with a cargo of timber. On arrival of the Lifeboat a tug was found to be already in attendance, but at the request of the master of the schooner the boat stood by him until the tide had flowed sufficiently to enable the tug to tow her clear. The weather was rough and squally, with a westerly gale and a rough sea. 1903 October 14th, Barque Sheffield, of Fredrikstad, saved 11 During the afternoon the barque Sheffield, of Fredrikstad, stranded on the West Gunfleet Sands. Information reached Clacton at 4.30pm, and the Lifeboat Albert Edward was at once launched, but on arrival at the vessel, the master declined the proffered help, at the same time requesting that the boat would stand by him in case it should be necessary to leave the barque. As the tide rose, the position of the vessel became even more critical, and at high tide the crew of eleven hands were obliged to abandon her, and ultimately she became a total wreck. The Lifeboat landed the men in safety at 6.15 the next morning. 1905 December 1st, Barge Falcon, of Maldon, saved 3 & Dog During a northerly gale and very heavy sea, the barge Falcon, of Maldon, was observed about 9.30am in distress off Clacton near the Buxey Sands, and the Lifeboat Albert Edward proceeded to her assistance. On reaching her it was found that her sails had blown away and the sea was making a clean breach over her. The Lifeboat men at once took steps to anchor the barge and lower the mast, and leaving some men in charge landed the three men belonging to her in safety, together with their dog. The Lifeboat then returned to the vessel and having disconnected the spirit and sail the mast was again got up, and the barge got under weigh, and with assistance of the Lifeboat conveyed to Brightlingsea, arriving there at about 9am next morning. 1906 February 10th, Yacht Isidora, of Dublin, saved yacht Shortly after midday on the 1oth February a message was received, stating that a vessel was apparently on the North Buxey Sands, and the Lifeboat Albert Edward was launched, but before she had proceeded far the vessel was forced by her sails, on the rising tide, over the sands and drove towards the beach. When the Lifeboat reached her she was found to be a derelict yacht named the Isidora; one of the Lifeboat men jumped on board and endeavoured to wear the yacht, but she took the ground before anything could be done. As there was no trace of the yacht’s crew the Lifeboat proceeded to a schooner which lay to leeward of where she originally stranded, but they could give no information respecting the missing men. The Lifeboat then returned to the yacht and took steps to try and save her, and at noon the next day they were successful in getting the vessel off and took her into Harwich Harbour. During the service a S.Westerly gale was blowing, with a heavy sea, and during the whole of the twenty four hours the men were on duty they were wet through by the breaking seas. It subsequently transpired that the crew of the yacht had landed at Margate. 1906 February 23rd, Schooner Renner, of Arbroath, saved 5 along with a dog About noon on the 23rd February, it was reported that a vessel was on the North Buxey Sand with a signal of distress flying. The Lifeboat Albert Edward was launched and proceeded to the vessel, which proved to be the schooner Renner, of Arbroath, bound to Feversham with a cargo of potatoes. On arrival it was found that the crew were making preparations to leave the schooner and were putting their belongings in the ship’s boat, but the Lifeboat men were engaged to save the vessel if possible. Fifteen tons of cargo was jettisoned and the anchor laid out; but on the next flood tide it was seen that in spite of the pumps the water in the vessel was gaining and that it was impossible to save her. At 1am on the 24th it was decided to abandon her, and the five men of the crew, together with their dog, having been taken aboard the Lifeboat, she made for Clacton. The night was extremely cold and all the men suffered considerably. 1906 August 25th, Yacht Wild Rose, of Burnham, Saved 4 and Yacht About 6am on the 25th August, a small yacht with four persons on board was seen to be dragging her anchors in the prevailing S. Westerly gale, and it was deemed expedient to send assistance. Eleven of the Lifeboat’s crew therefore proceeded to her in the boarding boat (ex lifeboat, Ellen Newman and John Bentley), and the anchor was weighed. The yacht then proceeded to Harwich Harbour with the coxswain in charge. There was a rough sea at the time of the service, and the yacht, which was the Wild Rose, of Burnham was on a lee shore. 1907 April 7th, Ketch Sabine, of Treguier, Stood by The ketch Sabine, of Treguier, when bound from Colchester to London on the 7th April, stranded on the Buxey Sand. The Northerly wind was moderate and the sea smooth, but as she was on a lee shore with the tide falling it was considered advisable to launch the Lifeboat. The assembly signal was fired at about 11am and within twelve minutes the Lifeboat Albert Edward was on her way to the ketch. Assistance was offered to get the vessel off, but this was declined. The Lifeboat then stood by the ketch until the tide flowed sufficiently to float her, and her crew, having got her clear of the sands, took her back to the River Colne. The Lifeboat arrived at Clacton at 6pm. 1909 August 3rd, Barque Magnat, of Langesund, transferred 9 to tug A telephone message from the Maplin Lighthouse at 5.30am on the 3rd August reported that the Swin Middle Light vessel was making signals for assistance. The Lifeboat Albert Edward was speedily launched, and when proceeding through the Swin Spitway the Coxswain observed a barque on the East Barrow Sand. He made for her and found she was the Magnat, of Langesund, bound from Brevig to London with a cargo of ice. The Boats of H.M.S. Vindictive had already transferred the captain’s wife and two children to a tug which was also standing by. The Coxswain offered his services, but the captain of the Magnat decided, the vessel’s back being already broken, to abandon her. The master and remaining men, eight in number, were taken into the Lifeboat, which conveyed them to the tug, and the Lifeboat then made for home. 1910 January 14th, H.M. tug Diligent with lighter in tow, assisted to save vessels About midnight on the 14th January, signals of distress were observed from a vessel apparently ashore on the Gunfleet Sands, and a telephone message was sent to the Gunfleet Lighthouse, asking for information. Shortly afterwards further signals were seen and the Lighthouse also fired rockets. The crew of the Lifeboat Albert Edward, at Clacton and of the James Stevens No.14, at Walton, were promptly summoned and the Lifeboats proceeded to the sands. They found H.M. tug Diligent with a lighter in tow, bound from Harwich to Sheerness, aground on the S.West part of the sand, and the captain gladly availed himself of the services of the Lifeboat men to try and float his vessel. At low water they ran out the vessel’s large bower anchor with a steel hawser attached, and when the tide made, eventually succeeded in getting the vessel clear. The Lifeboats then returned to their stations. 1910 February 12th,  Ketch barge Cecilia, of London, assisted to save 4 and vessel At 8am the Coastguard reported a barge at anchor near the South East Buxey Sand, with her foremast and head gear carried away, but there was no signal indicating that help was required. The barge was kept under observation and a little later a flag was hoisted as a signal of distress. The Lifeboat Albert Edward was promptly launched and found the ketch rigged barge Cecilia, of London, bound from Whitstable with coal, in a crippled condition. The master reported that a steamer had collided with him the previous night. He availed himself of the offer of the Lifeboat men, and taking the barge in tow they succeeded in saving the vessel and her crew of four hands. 1910 October 13th, Lugger Prince De Joinville, of Boulogne, saved 21 and vessel In response to a telephone message from the Gunfleet Lighthouse, stating that a French lugger was driving up the “Swin” with distress signals flying, the Lifeboat Albert Edward was launched at 4.30pm. On reaching the vessel, which proved to be the lugger Prince De Joinville, of Boulogne, with twenty one hands on board, the Master employed the Lifeboat men to try and save his vessel, as he had completely lost his bearings. The Lifeboat men took charge, and having set more sail, eventually succeeded in getting the lugger in safely to Sheerness. At noon the next day the boat started for Clacton, and after very arduous efforts, reached home at 7.45pm. 1910 December 1st, Schooner Pearl, of Dundee, saved 5 At 1am the Coastguard reported that a telephone message had been received from the Maplin Lighthouse, stating that signals of distress were being made in the vicinity of the Mouse Light vessel. It was blowing a moderate S.Easterly gale with a very rough sea. The Lifeboat Albert Edward was promptly launched and proceeded in the direction indicated. The Coxswain searched for some considerable time without result. He then decided to wait until daylight in case the vessel, which had been making the distress signals, should still be on the Sands. Shortly after 6 o’clock, a vessel was seen and the Lifeboat proceeded to her with all speed. On getting along side she proved to be the Pearl, of Dundee, bound from Middlesbrough to London, with a cargo of salt. She was then full of water, and her decks were being constantly swept by the waves. The Captain and four of the crew were rescued in an exhausted condition, but unfortunately one man had been washed away and drowned before the Lifeboat reached the vessel. This was a very trying service, as the Lifeboat men were wet through and suffered much from the cold during the night. 1910 December 4-8th & 9-11th, Steamship Antigone, of London, assisted to save 24 and vessel At 9am on the 4th December the Coastguard reported that a vessel appeared to be ashore on the East Barrow Sand, and the Lifeboat Albert Edward was launched. The vessel was the s.s. Antigone, of London, bound from Smyrna to London, with a crew of twenty four hands. The Lifeboat men were engaged to save the vessel. About 400 tons of cargo was jettisoned, and four days after she had stranded they succeeded in getting the steamer off the sands. She was then towed in to deep water, and the Lifeboat returned to her station, arriving at 6pm. Next morning it was reported that the same vessel again appeared to be aground. The Lifeboat was launched, and on reaching the vessel found that the surmise was correct, and that the vessel was the Antigone. The Captain explained that the second accident had occurred owing to the steering gear of the vessel being out of order. The Lifeboat men were again employed, and at about 6pm on the 11th December the vessel was again floated and towed into safety. The Lifeboat then returned to her station, arriving at 9.30pm, after two very long and arduous services.
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ALBERT EDWARD III

1901 - 1929
The 1st Lifeboat at Clacton on Sea arrived by courtesy of the Great Eastern Railway which then only came as far as Weeley, Essex. Named the Albert Edward it was then taken to the new boathouse which was built on a site donated for the purpose at the junction of Carnarvon Road and Church Road. The Hon. Architect of the RNLI C.H.Cooke, Esq. F.R.S.,B.A., designed the boathouse. The boat supplied was 34 feet long and 8 feet 3 ins. of beam and rowed 10 oars double banked. The Ceremony of dedication was held on 10th July 1878 after the boat had been in service for a few months.

Services

(from The Lifeboat Journal)

1902 February 2nd, Steamship Dungonnel, of Glasgow, assisted to save 11 & vessel The Coastguard having informed the coxswain of the Lifeboat Albert Edward, on the morning of the 2nd February, that signals had been fired by the Swin Middle Light-vessel, he summoned the crew, and at 5.30 the Lifeboat was launched. On speaking to the light-vessel the coxswain was informed that the signals had been fired in answer to those of the Mouse Lightship, and the boat at once proceeded in that direction and found the s.s. Dungonell, of Glasgow, bound from Grangemouth for London, with coal, stranded on the Black Tail Spit. A whole gale was blowing from the East and the sea was very heavy. The Lifeboat men were engaged to jettison the cargo, and they continued to do so until 5pm, when the sea increased to such an extent that it became necessary to batten down the hatches. At 7 o’clock the engines were put astern, but before high water they were choked with sand, and the ship did not move with that tide. At 9.30 the jettisoning was again commenced, and continued until 4.30am, when one of the steamer’s boats was launched and took a line to a steam tug, by means of which a tow- line was brought to the vessel and made fast. At high water the tug succeeded in towing the vessel off the sand, and at once her anchor had to be let go so as to avoid collision with another vessel. The crew of the steamer, eleven in number, were so thoroughly exhausted that the Lifeboat men were requested by the captain to get in the anchor and the sixty fathoms of chain attached; this they did by manual labour, no steam power being available. The tug then towed the steamer in the direction of Gravesend, the coxswain of the Lifeboat accompanying her, and the boat returning to her station, which was reached at 3.15pm on the 3rd February, the s.s. Merlin, belonging to the General Steam Navigation Company, of London, kindly towing her part of the way. 1902 March 15th, Fishing ketch Cranina, of Brixham, saved vessel A severe north-westerly gale was experienced off Clacton on the morning of the 15th March accompanied by a rough sea. About 8.15am a vessel was seen drifting towards the Gunfleet Sands. Information was at once conveyed to the Lifeboat authorities, and the Assistant Honorary Secretary, on seeing the vessel was getting into a dangerous position, decided to launch the Lifeboat Albert Edward. This was done shortly after 9am, and on coming up with the vessel, she was found to be the ketch Crania, of Brixham, but no one was on board. The coxswain without delay, put some men on her, and sail having been set, a start was made to take her to Brightlingsea. On the way they fell in with the owner, who had come out in a smack, and he accepted the offer of the Coxswain to see the ketch into safety. As soon   as the ketch was under weigh the Lifeboat returned to her station; during the whole of the time she was afloat her behaviour evoked the greatest of praise, the local authorities speaking in the highest terms of her performance. 1902 July 1st, Brigantine Hilda, of Abo, stood by At 10.45am on the 1st July, a message was received from the Gunfleet Light House, stating that a barque was ashore about four and a half miles to the W.S.W. The signal to muster the Lifeboat crew was fired, and the Albert Edward Lifeboat at once proceeded to the ship, which proved to be the brigantine Hilda, of Abo, bound from London to Shields, in ballast. The wind and sea were moderate, so the captain declined any assistance, but asked that the Lifeboat should remain alongside until his vessel floated. This request was complied with, and on the vessel re-floating, apparently undamaged, no further help being required, the boat returned to her station. 1903 September 9th, Schooner Martha, of Rudkjobing, stood by In the early morning a message was received stating that a vessel was showing distress signals on the Maplin Sands. The crew of the Lifeboat Albert Edward were immediately summoned, and the boat proceeded to the position indicated. The vessel proved to be the schooner Martha, of Rudkjobing, bound for London with a cargo of timber. On arrival of the Lifeboat a tug was found to be already in attendance, but at the request of the master of the schooner the boat stood by him until the tide had flowed sufficiently to enable the tug to tow her clear. The weather was rough and squally, with a westerly gale and a rough sea. 1903 October 14th, Barque Sheffield, of Fredrikstad, saved 11 During the afternoon the barque Sheffield, of Fredrikstad, stranded on the West Gunfleet Sands. Information reached Clacton at 4.30pm, and the Lifeboat Albert Edward was at once launched, but on arrival at the vessel, the master declined the proffered help, at the same time requesting that the boat would stand by him in case it should be necessary to leave the barque. As the tide rose, the position of the vessel became even more critical, and at high tide the crew of eleven hands were obliged to abandon her, and ultimately she became a total wreck. The Lifeboat landed the men in safety at 6.15 the next morning. 1905 December 1st, Barge Falcon, of Maldon, saved 3 & Dog During a northerly gale and very heavy sea, the barge Falcon, of Maldon, was observed about 9.30am in distress off Clacton near the Buxey Sands, and the Lifeboat Albert Edward proceeded to her assistance. On reaching her it was found that her sails had blown away and the sea was making a clean breach over her. The Lifeboat men at once took steps to anchor the barge and lower the mast, and leaving some men in charge landed the three men belonging to her in safety, together with their dog. The Lifeboat then returned to the vessel and having disconnected the spirit and sail the mast was again got up, and the barge got under weigh, and with assistance of the Lifeboat conveyed to Brightlingsea, arriving there at about 9am next morning. 1906 February 10th, Yacht Isidora, of Dublin, saved yacht Shortly after midday on the 1oth February a message was received, stating that a vessel was apparently on the North Buxey Sands, and the Lifeboat Albert Edward was launched, but before she had proceeded far the vessel was forced by her sails, on the rising tide, over the sands and drove towards the beach. When the Lifeboat reached her she was found to be a derelict yacht named the Isidora; one of the Lifeboat men jumped on board and endeavoured to wear the yacht, but she took the ground before anything could be done. As there was no trace of the yacht’s crew the Lifeboat proceeded to a schooner which lay to leeward of where she originally stranded, but they could give no information respecting the missing men. The Lifeboat then returned to the yacht and took steps to try and save her, and at noon the next day they were successful in getting the vessel off and took her into Harwich Harbour. During the service a S.Westerly gale was blowing, with a heavy sea, and during the whole of the twenty four hours the men were on duty they were wet through by the breaking seas. It subsequently transpired that the crew of the yacht had landed at Margate. 1906 February 23rd, Schooner Renner, of Arbroath, saved 5 along with a dog About noon on the 23rd February, it was reported that a vessel was on the North Buxey Sand with a signal of distress flying. The Lifeboat Albert Edward was launched and proceeded to the vessel, which proved to be the schooner Renner, of Arbroath, bound to Feversham with a cargo of potatoes. On arrival it was found that the crew were making preparations to leave the schooner and were putting their belongings in the ship’s boat, but the Lifeboat men were engaged to save the vessel if possible. Fifteen tons of cargo was jettisoned and the anchor laid out; but on the next flood tide it was seen that in spite of the pumps the water in the vessel was gaining and that it was impossible to save her. At 1am on the 24th it was decided to abandon her, and the five men of the crew, together with their dog, having been taken aboard the Lifeboat, she made for Clacton. The night was extremely cold and all the men suffered considerably. 1906 August 25th, Yacht Wild Rose, of Burnham, Saved 4 and Yacht About 6am on the 25th August, a small yacht with four persons on board was seen to be dragging her anchors in the prevailing S. Westerly gale, and it was deemed expedient to send assistance. Eleven of the Lifeboat’s crew therefore proceeded to her in the boarding boat (ex lifeboat, Ellen Newman and John Bentley), and the anchor was weighed. The yacht then proceeded to Harwich Harbour with the coxswain in charge. There was a rough sea at the time of the service, and the yacht, which was the Wild Rose, of Burnham was on a lee shore. 1907 April 7th, Ketch Sabine, of Treguier, Stood by The ketch Sabine, of Treguier, when bound from Colchester to London on the 7th April, stranded on the Buxey Sand. The Northerly wind was moderate and the sea smooth, but as she was on a lee shore with the tide falling it was considered advisable to launch the Lifeboat. The assembly signal was fired at about 11am and within twelve minutes the Lifeboat Albert Edward was on her way to the ketch. Assistance was offered to get the vessel off, but this was declined. The Lifeboat then stood by the ketch until the tide flowed sufficiently to float her, and her crew, having got her clear of the sands, took her back to the River Colne. The Lifeboat arrived at Clacton at 6pm. 1909 August 3rd, Barque Magnat, of Langesund, transferred 9 to tug A telephone message from the Maplin Lighthouse at 5.30am on the 3rd August reported that the Swin Middle Light vessel was making signals for assistance. The Lifeboat Albert Edward was speedily launched, and when proceeding through the Swin Spitway the Coxswain observed a barque on the East Barrow Sand. He made for her and found she was the Magnat, of Langesund, bound from Brevig to London with a cargo of ice. The Boats of H.M.S. Vindictive had already transferred the captain’s wife and two children to a tug which was also standing by. The Coxswain offered his services, but the captain of the Magnat decided, the vessel’s back being already broken, to abandon her. The master and remaining men, eight in number, were taken into the Lifeboat, which conveyed them to the tug, and the Lifeboat then made for home. 1910 January 14th, H.M. tug Diligent with lighter in tow, assisted to save vessels About midnight on the 14th January, signals of distress were observed from a vessel apparently ashore on the Gunfleet Sands, and a telephone message was sent to the Gunfleet Lighthouse, asking for information. Shortly afterwards further signals were seen and the Lighthouse also fired rockets. The crew of the Lifeboat Albert Edward, at Clacton and of the James Stevens No.14, at Walton, were promptly summoned and the Lifeboats proceeded to the sands. They found H.M. tug Diligent with a lighter in tow, bound from Harwich to Sheerness, aground on the S.West part of the sand, and the captain gladly availed himself of the services of the Lifeboat men to try and float his vessel. At low water they ran out the vessel’s large bower anchor with a steel hawser attached, and when the tide made, eventually succeeded in getting the vessel clear. The Lifeboats then returned to their stations. 1910 February 12th,  Ketch barge Cecilia, of London, assisted to save 4 and vessel At 8am the Coastguard reported a barge at anchor near the South East Buxey Sand, with her foremast and head gear carried away, but there was no signal indicating that help was required. The barge was kept under observation and a little later a flag was hoisted as a signal of distress. The Lifeboat Albert Edward was promptly launched and found the ketch rigged barge Cecilia, of London, bound from Whitstable with coal, in a crippled condition. The master reported that a steamer had collided with him the previous night. He availed himself of the offer of the Lifeboat men, and taking the barge in tow they succeeded in saving the vessel and her crew of four hands. 1910 October 13th, Lugger Prince De Joinville, of Boulogne, saved 21 and vessel In response to a telephone message from the Gunfleet Lighthouse, stating that a French lugger was driving up the “Swin” with distress signals flying, the Lifeboat Albert Edward was launched at 4.30pm. On reaching the vessel, which proved to be the lugger Prince De Joinville, of Boulogne, with twenty one hands on board, the Master employed the Lifeboat men to try and save his vessel, as he had completely lost his bearings. The Lifeboat men took charge, and having set more sail, eventually succeeded in getting the lugger in safely to Sheerness. At noon the next day the boat started for Clacton, and after very arduous efforts, reached home at 7.45pm. 1910 December 1st, Schooner Pearl, of Dundee, saved 5 At 1am the Coastguard reported that a telephone message had been received from the Maplin Lighthouse, stating that signals of distress were being made in the vicinity of the Mouse Light vessel. It was blowing a moderate S.Easterly gale with a very rough sea. The Lifeboat Albert Edward was promptly launched and proceeded in the direction indicated. The Coxswain searched for some considerable time without result. He then decided to wait until daylight in case the vessel, which had been making the distress signals, should still be on the Sands. Shortly after 6 o’clock, a vessel was seen and the Lifeboat proceeded to her with all speed. On getting along side she proved to be the Pearl, of Dundee, bound from Middlesbrough to London, with a cargo of salt. She was then full of water, and her decks were being constantly swept by the waves. The Captain and four of the crew were rescued in an exhausted condition, but unfortunately one man had been washed away and drowned before the Lifeboat reached the vessel. This was a very trying service, as the Lifeboat men were wet through and suffered much from the cold during the night. 1910 December 4-8th & 9-11th, Steamship Antigone, of London, assisted to save 24 and vessel At 9am on the 4th December the Coastguard reported that a vessel appeared to be ashore on the East Barrow Sand, and the Lifeboat Albert Edward was launched. The vessel was the s.s. Antigone, of London, bound from Smyrna to London, with a crew of twenty four hands. The Lifeboat men were engaged to save the vessel. About 400 tons of cargo was jettisoned, and four days after she had stranded they succeeded in getting the steamer off the sands. She was then towed in to deep water, and the Lifeboat returned to her station, arriving at 6pm. Next morning it was reported that the same vessel again appeared to be aground. The Lifeboat was launched, and on reaching the vessel found that the surmise was correct, and that the vessel was the Antigone. The Captain explained that the second accident had occurred owing to the steering gear of the vessel being out of order. The Lifeboat men were again employed, and at about 6pm on the 11th December the vessel was again floated and towed into safety. The Lifeboat then returned to her station, arriving at 9.30pm, after two very long and arduous services.
SERVICES - PAGE 2 SERVICES - PAGE 2
Clacton Lifeboat Station
Clacton Lifeboat Station
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