ALBERT EDWARD II

1885 - 1901
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The National Lifeboat Institution has recently sent a new Lifeboat to Clacton-on-sea, to take the place of the smaller boat on that station. The new boat is 39 feet long, 9 feet wide, rows 12 oars double banked, and possesses all the latest improvements. Amongst other things it is fitted with a sliding keel, being a new adaptation of the centre board to the requirements of a Lifeboat, which materially increases her stability and Weatherly qualities whilst in deep water, without sacrificing the flat floor and light draught, so necessary in shallow water. The sliding keel can either be lowered to its full extent at both ends, giving a uniform increased draught of 14 inches for its whole length, or it can be triced up at either end, or put in any desired position. Should it be bent by a blow, or other cause, so that it cannot be triced up, it can be slipped downwards and abandoned, and the boat will never the less be a stable self-righting Lifeboat. A new transporting launching carriage has been provided for the boat, and two wooden slipways have recently been constructed for her to use at a very considerable expense, so that she can be readily launched from either side of the pier at Clacton. The new boat like the old one, is named the Albert Edward, after H.R.H. the Prince of Wales.

Services

(from The Lifeboat Journal)

1885 November 1st - Barque Garland, of Aland, assisted to save vessel and 14 Signal rockets having been fired by the Swin-Middle and Maplin Lightships on the 1st November, the Lifeboat Albert Edward was launched at 4am, during a very strong N.E. wind and rough sea. The boat made her way across the Wallet, through the Swin Spitway into the Swin, when a flare was observed bearing southward; she went in that direction; another flare was seen, and shortly afterwards a ship was sighted. She had stranded near the West Middle Buoy. On arriving at the vessel, which proved to be the barque Garland, of Aland, bound for London with timber, and carrying a crew of 14 men, the services of the Lifeboat men were engaged to get her afloat. The men boarded her, one of them getting his leg badly jammed between the Boat and ship in doing so, and the anchor and chain were slipped and the sail set. In performing the latter service, one of the crew of the vessel fell from the upper topsailyard and was killed almost instantaneously. The assistance of a steam trawler was then secured, and the ship was towed in to deep water, leaking very much, and having her rudder unshipped. It was now found necessary to engage another tug, and the ship was towed to London, the Lifeboat accompanying her to the Victoria Docks, where she arrived at about 9 o’clock on the following morning, the Lifeboat being continually at the pumps. At 9.30 the Lifeboat returned to her station, the tug Champion, of Grimsby, kindly taking her in tow to the Swin Spit, and Clacton was reached at about 6pm, the men being all worn-out with the excessive fatigue they had undergone. 1886 April 7th - Cutter yacht Cruisada, saved abandoned yacht On the evening of the 7th April a small vessel was observed in the Wallet channel, S.E. of Clacton pier, during a strong S.W. wind and a very rough sea. With the aid of a powerful glass, it was seen that she was disabled, and there appeared to be nobody on board. Still as there was a possibility of the crew being in the cabin, it was deemed advisable to launch the Albert Edward Lifeboat, in case help should be needed. The Lifeboat put off at 6.45, and on reaching the vessel found that she was a small cutter yacht of about 5 tons, named the Cruisada, abandoned, half full of water, and with everything in disorder. The Lifeboat took her in tow and made for Harwich, arriving there at about 9pm, and having handed her over to the proper authorities, returned to her station on the following day. 1886 November 5th - Three masted schooner Ocean Bride, of Guernsey, saved 8 On the morning of the 5th of November, a three masted vessel was observed ashore on the East Burrows or Sunk Sand, but no signals could be made out even with the aid of a powerful telescope. The wind was blowing from the S.S.W. accompanied by rain, and the sea was very rough. At 8.40am the Albert Edward Lifeboat was launched, having the wind and tide against her, at about 11 o’clock the wind and rain increased, and at 2 o’clock two reefs had to be taken in both lugsails. On reaching the vessel at about 2.30, she was found to be the three masted schooner Ocean Bride, of Guernsey, bound from Shields for Granville with coal, ashore on the Middle Sunk Sand. The master requested the Lifeboat to stand by in case the vessel did not come off. The tide was the rising, and at about 4pm the crew signalled that they wished to be taken off; the Lifeboat then, with much difficulty and danger, rescued the master and the crew, consisting of seven men and a boy, with their clothing, and landed them at Clacton at about 6 o’clock. The vessel became a total wreck. 1887 October 10th - Schooner Venus, of Teignmouth, stood by Signal guns having been fired by the Lightships on the evening of the 10th October, the No.2 Lifeboat Theodore and Herbert put off from Southend and the Albert Edward Lifeboat was launched from Clacton at about seven o’clock. They found the Schooner Venus, of Teignmouth, bound from London for Tyne in ballast, stranded on the Maplin Sands, and remained by her until 6 o’clock on the following morning. 1888 February 17th - Brig Ispilen, of Kragero, landed 9 from Swin Middle Lightvessel Signals from the Swin Middle Light-vessel were observed on the morning of the 17th February, during a N.E. wind and a rough sea. The Albert Edward Lifeboat was launched at 3.30;proceeded to the Light-vessel, and found the crew consisting of nine men, of the brig Ispilen, of Kragero, had taken refuge there, having taken to their boat on their vessel stranding on the Whitaker Spit. These men were with difficulty taken into the Lifeboat, which then proceeded to the stranded vessel; but it was found that she had eight feet of water and sand in her, and would become a total wreck. She was bound from Christiania for Lowestoft, with a cargo of ice. The Lifeboat then returned to her station, being kindly towed by the s.s. Erasmus Wilson, of London, as far as the N.E. Gunfleet buoy, and reached Clacton at Mid-day. 1888 February 21st - Schooner Dorothea, of Riga, assisted to save vessel and 4 At 4.30am on the 21st February the Albert Edward Lifeboat was launched, signals having been fired by the Swin Middle Light-vessel. The morning was bitterly cold; a very strong wind was blowing from the N.E., and the sea was very rough. Flares were afterwards seen, apparently shown by a vessel ashore on the Whitaker or Buxey Sands, and the Lifeboat burned blue-lights in response, but no further signals being shown, she proceeded to the Light-ship, were the crew were informed that a vessel was in distress bearing S.W. by W. After going some distance and seeing nothing of the vessel, the course was altered for the Maplin Light, where the same information was given. Proceeding again in the direction indicated, the Lifeboat men eventually found the schooner Dorothea, of Riga, bound from Memel for London with oak staves, and having a crew of four men, just below the West Maplin Buoy; she was full of water, and had lost her rudder. The Lifeboat men weighed the anchor, set some of thew sails, and the Lifeboat was made fast astern, so as to steer the vessel, but owing to the heavy sea a ship being waterlogged, the services of a steam-tug had also been secured. After some time, the hawsers repeatedly breaking, the vessel was got off the sand and was taken to Gravesend, which was reached at about 5 o’clock in the afternoon. The Lifeboat crew went ashore for food, having had but little since leaving home in the morning, after obtaining which they returned to the ship. The Coxswain and two men remained on board to assist in taking the vessel to London. About 1.30 on the following afternoon the Lifeboat, with eleven men, under the charge of the assistant Coxswain, started to return to her station, but owing to adverse winds, and being unable to obtain a tow from any vessel proceeding towards the Swin, the crew took refuge on board the tug Victoria until daylight, when they left the tug and were kindly taken in tow by the s.s. Columbia, of London, as far as the N.E. Gunfleet Buoy, the boat reaching Clacton Pier at 7.45pm, the crew being worn out by exposure and cold. 1888 February 27th - Steamer Blonde, of Whitehaven, assisted to save vessel and 10 On the 27th February, at 1.15pm, the Albert Edward Lifeboat put off to the assistance of the steamer Blonde, of Whitehaven, bound from Goole for London with a cargo of coal and oil, and carrying a crew of ten men, which had stranded on the Gunfleet Sands, during a N.E. wind and a moderate sea. The Lifeboat men, with the help of the crews of two small smacks, lightened the vessel by throwing some of the cargo overboard, and when the tide rose, the ship was towed off by the steam tug Harwich, which took her to London, the Lifeboat returning to station, which she reached at 2pm, after an absence of twenty-four hours. 1888 April 25th - Barque Flekkefjord, of Flekkefjord, assisted to save vessel and 12 In response to signals, the Albert Edward was launched at midnight on the 25th April, during a strong N.E. wind and a rough sea, and proceeded under double reefed sails to the Swin Middle Light-vessel, where the crew were informed that there was a vessel on the Barrow Sands. The boat at once went in that direction, and found the barque Flekkefjord, of Flekkefjord, Norway, bound from Christiansand for London with a cargo of timber, and having as crew of twelve men, stranded about a third of a mile S.S.W. of the Middle Buoy; she was full of water, and her rudder was unshipped. Preparations were made for getting the vessel afloat and when the tide rose, the steam tug Storm Cork attached her hawser, and eventually the barque was got afloat and taken to London, the Lifeboat remain astern so as to steer her as far as the Chapman Light. The Lifeboat was taken in tow by the s.s. America on her return, and arrived back at her station at about 7.70am on the 27th April. The coxswain and five of the Lifeboat men remained onboard the barque, to assist to take her to London. 1888 November 5th – 7th, Barque Minnet, of Helsingborg, saved 15 Signal having been heard, the Lifeboat, temporarily placed at Clacton-on-Sea whilst the boat belonging to the station was being altered, was launched at 3am, and proceeded to the Swin Middle Light-vessel. The Lifeboat men were informed that the signals made there were in reception of those shown from the Maplin Lightship. The Lifeboat therefore made for the Maplin Sands, and found the barque Minnet, of Helsingborg, timber laden, ashore there. Some of the Lifeboat men boarded the vessel, to make arrangements for an attempt to get her afloat, and the boat proceeded to Gravesend to procure the services of a steam tug. When the steamer arrived she was unable to get near the ship, and ultimately it became necessary to abandon vessel, as it was feared she would soon break up. Her crew of twelve men, a pilot, and two fishermen who were on board, with the crew’s baggage, were then taken aboard the Lifeboat and landed at Sheerness, the boat being taken into the dockyard, and her crew receiving most kind treatment at the hands of the Port Admiral and the authorities of the Royal Navel Barracks. The boat returned to her station at 1.15pm, on the 7th November, after an absence of fifty-eight hours, being towed part of the way by the steamers Hawk and James Southern, both of London 1890 October 3rd - Boats of Bbarque Larissa, of Blyth, saved 8 At about 6.30am on the 3rd October, 1890, the second coxswain of the Lifeboat reported to the superintendent that a barque had stranded on the S.W. Gunfleet sand, and on looking a the vessel with a telescope it was seen to be showing signals of distress. The usual sound signals were fired to summon the crew of the Lifeboat Albert Edward; the boat was launched in a rough sea, a strong gale blowing from the W.S.West, and with all possible speed sailed to the scene of the wreck. She went across the Wallet to the Gunfleet West Buoy, experiencing some difficulty in crossing the sands, the tide being low, and then proceeded down the Swin towards the stranded barque. Whilst she was making for the wreck, two boats were seen to leave and go in the direction of the Gunfleet Lighthouse, and on coming up with these boats, they were found to contain the vessel’s crew of eight men with their baggage. The men and their effects were taken into the Lifeboat, one of the ship’s boats was cut adrift, and the other being a better one, was taken in tow. A signal was then made to the steamer Albatross, of Grimsby, to tow the Lifeboat, and the master and crew very kindly did so, taking her as far as the Swin Spitway when she was cast off, after which sail was set and she returned to her station at 12 o’clock noon. Whilst in tow of the steamer the line of the ship’s boat parted, owing to the heavy sea, and the boat wass lost. The wrecked vessel was the Larissa, of Blyth, 315 tons, bound from North Shields with a cargo of coal. 1891 March 10th - Schooner J.W. Bebell, of Beaumaris, saved 1 On the morning of the 10th March news was received that a man had landed about two miles east of Clacton at eight o’clock in a open boat which was nearly full of water. He had been taken to a farmhouse by some labouring people, and stated that he had left four men on his vessel, the schooner J.W Bebell, of Beaumaris, bound from Aberdeen for London with a cargo of granite. The coxswain of the Lifeboat Albert Edward, on being apprised of the event, at once proceeded in a conveyance to the farmhouse to obtain from the man the aproximate position of the vessel. He brought the man with him in the carriage to Clacton, and handed him over to the charge of the Shipwrecked Mariners’ Society Agent. At 11.30 the Lifeboat was launched, proceeded across the Wallet and Gunfleet Sands, and was kindly taken in tow by the s.s Rosalind, of Newcastle, to about two miles below the Gunfleet Light, where the boat was slipped, sail was set, and after passing through a tremendous quantity of broken water and shipping several heavy seas, she arrived at the vessel and found two men in the main rigging. One of the men was taken into the Lifeboat; he reported the other man was dead, and the master and the cook had been washed overboard and drowned. One of the Lifeboat men ascended the rigging, cut away the lashings of the dead body, and lowered it into the boat. While this was being effected one of the boat’s crew was dragged overboard by the vessel’s rigging, but was happily rescued by his comrades. The Lifeboat then made for her station, and arrived there at 4.30pm. 1891 October 27th - Barque Oliver Cromwell, of Oland, saved 11 Signals of distress being seen, the Lifeboat Albert Edward was launched at 9.50am in a heavy sea, thick weather, and a strong gale of wind from E.S.East, and found the barque Oliver Cromwell, of Oland, ashore on the Whitaker Sand, having parted from both her anchors. The master of the vessel had left in a smack, intending to land at Brightlingsea and telegraph Harwich for a steam tug, but it could be seen from the deck of the barque that the smack had also run aground. The mate of the vessel stated that the crew would not leave the ship until all chances of saving her had vanished, although at that time she had ten feet of water in her hold, with all hands at the pumps. The Lifeboat remained by until 4pm, when the seas were making a clean breach over her, and it became necessary to leave her. The crew were with considerable difficulty taken into the Lifeboat, which then proceeded to the stranded smack, and found that part of her crew and the master of the barque had been taken off by another smack, which was lying at anchor. The Lifeboat made for the latter vessel, took the captain on board, and returned to Clacton, were all were safely landed. 1892 February 13th - Barque Saga, of Flekkefjord, saved 11 On the afternoon of the 13th February, while a moderate N.E.  wind was blowing and the sea was rough, a vessel was seen ashore on the Sunk Sand. The Lifeboat Albert Edward was launched at 5.35, and found that the stranded vessel was the barque Saga, of Flekkefjord, bound from Gothenburg for London with a cargo of firewood. At first the master declined assistance, but when the tide flowed the sea became heavy and at about 12 o’clock a portion of the vessel’s keel and some bottom planks came up alongside. The ship then filled with water and as it was evident that there was no chance of saving her the master decided to abandon her and he with his crew of ten men and their luggage were taken into the Lifeboat and brought safely ashore. 1892 February 16th - Ketch Don, of Great Yarmouth, saved vessel and 6 Signals of distress having been seen by the Middle Light Vessel on the 16th February, the Lifeboat Albert Edward was launched at 1.15am, proceeded to the Lightship and was informed that a vessel was ashore on the Maplin Sands. The Lifeboat then went to the Sands and found the ketch Don, of Great Yarmouth, stranded about three miles W.N.West of the Swin Lightship. The Lifeboat remained by her until the following tide, laid out an anchor and got the vessel afloat. The ketch had lost her rudder, and as the wind and tide were adverse, considerable difficulty was experienced with the vessel until a jury rudder had been rigged, when she was taken into the river at Burnham, the pumps being continually at work during the whole time. The Lifeboat men were engaged nearly forty-two hours in rendering this service and suffered much from the intense cold, blinding snow storms, great exertion and want of sleep. The rigging of the boat was covered with ice. 1893 November 20th, Schooner Nora, of Mandal, saved 7 and vessel No Article Found 1893 November 21st, barque Harald Haarfager, saved 11 No Article Found
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ALBERT EDWARD II

1885 - 1901
The National Lifeboat Institution has recently sent a new Lifeboat to Clacton-on-sea, to take the place of the smaller boat on that station. The new boat is 39 feet long, 9 feet wide, rows 12 oars double banked, and possesses all the latest improvements. Amongst other things it is fitted with a sliding keel, being a new adaptation of the centre board to the requirements of a Lifeboat, which materially increases her stability and Weatherly qualities whilst in deep water, without sacrificing the flat floor and light draught, so necessary in shallow water. The sliding keel can either be lowered to its full extent at both ends, giving a uniform increased draught of 14 inches for its whole length, or it can be triced up at either end, or put in any desired position. Should it be bent by a blow, or other cause, so that it cannot be triced up, it can be slipped downwards and abandoned, and the boat will never the less be a stable self-righting Lifeboat. A new transporting launching carriage has been provided for the boat, and two wooden slipways have recently been constructed for her to use at a very considerable expense, so that she can be readily launched from either side of the pier at Clacton. The new boat like the old one, is named the Albert Edward, after H.R.H. the Prince of Wales.

Services

(from The Lifeboat Journal)

1885 November 1st - Barque Garland, of Aland, assisted to save vessel and 14 Signal rockets having been fired by the Swin-Middle and Maplin Lightships on the 1st November, the Lifeboat Albert Edward was launched at 4am, during a very strong N.E. wind and rough sea. The boat made her way across the Wallet, through the Swin Spitway into the Swin, when a flare was observed bearing southward; she went in that direction; another flare was seen, and shortly afterwards a ship was sighted. She had stranded near the West Middle Buoy. On arriving at the vessel, which proved to be the barque Garland, of Aland, bound for London with timber, and carrying a crew of 14 men, the services of the Lifeboat men were engaged to get her afloat. The men boarded her, one of them getting his leg badly jammed between the Boat and ship in doing so, and the anchor and chain were slipped and the sail set. In performing the latter service, one of the crew of the vessel fell from the upper topsailyard and was killed almost instantaneously. The assistance of a steam trawler was then secured, and the ship was towed in to deep water, leaking very much, and having her rudder unshipped. It was now found necessary to engage another tug, and the ship was towed to London, the Lifeboat accompanying her to the Victoria Docks, where she arrived at about 9 o’clock on the following morning, the Lifeboat being continually at the pumps. At 9.30 the Lifeboat returned to her station, the tug Champion, of Grimsby, kindly taking her in tow to the Swin Spit, and Clacton was reached at about 6pm, the men being all worn-out with the excessive fatigue they had undergone. 1886 April 7th - Cutter yacht Cruisada, saved abandoned yacht On the evening of the 7th April a small vessel was observed in the Wallet channel, S.E. of Clacton pier, during a strong S.W. wind and a very rough sea. With the aid of a powerful glass, it was seen that she was disabled, and there appeared to be nobody on board. Still as there was a possibility of the crew being in the cabin, it was deemed advisable to launch the Albert Edward Lifeboat, in case help should be needed. The Lifeboat put off at 6.45, and on reaching the vessel found that she was a small cutter yacht of about 5 tons, named the Cruisada, abandoned, half full of water, and with everything in disorder. The Lifeboat took her in tow and made for Harwich, arriving there at about 9pm, and having handed her over to the proper authorities, returned to her station on the following day. 1886 November 5th - Three masted schooner Ocean Bride, of Guernsey, saved 8 On the morning of the 5th of November, a three masted vessel was observed ashore on the East Burrows or Sunk Sand, but no signals could be made out even with the aid of a powerful telescope. The wind was blowing from the S.S.W. accompanied by rain, and the sea was very rough. At 8.40am the Albert Edward Lifeboat was launched, having the wind and tide against her, at about 11 o’clock the wind and rain increased, and at 2 o’clock two reefs had to be taken in both lugsails. On reaching the vessel at about 2.30, she was found to be the three masted schooner Ocean Bride, of Guernsey, bound from Shields for Granville with coal, ashore on the Middle Sunk Sand. The master requested the Lifeboat to stand by in case the vessel did not come off. The tide was the rising, and at about 4pm the crew signalled that they wished to be taken off; the Lifeboat then, with much difficulty and danger, rescued the master and the crew, consisting of seven men and a boy, with their clothing, and landed them at Clacton at about 6 o’clock. The vessel became a total wreck. 1887 October 10th - Schooner Venus, of Teignmouth, stood by Signal guns having been fired by the Lightships on the evening of the 10th October, the No.2 Lifeboat Theodore and Herbert put off from Southend and the Albert Edward Lifeboat was launched from Clacton at about seven o’clock. They found the Schooner Venus, of Teignmouth, bound from London for Tyne in ballast, stranded on the Maplin Sands, and remained by her until 6 o’clock on the following morning. 1888 February 17th - Brig Ispilen, of Kragero, landed 9 from Swin Middle Lightvessel Signals from the Swin Middle Light-vessel were observed on the morning of the 17th February, during a N.E. wind and a rough sea. The Albert Edward Lifeboat was launched at 3.30;proceeded to the Light-vessel, and found the crew consisting of nine men, of the brig Ispilen, of Kragero, had taken refuge there, having taken to their boat on their vessel stranding on the Whitaker Spit. These men were with difficulty taken into the Lifeboat, which then proceeded to the stranded vessel; but it was found that she had eight feet of water and sand in her, and would become a total wreck. She was bound from Christiania for Lowestoft, with a cargo of ice. The Lifeboat then returned to her station, being kindly towed by the s.s. Erasmus Wilson, of London, as far as the N.E. Gunfleet buoy, and reached Clacton at Mid-day. 1888 February 21st - Schooner Dorothea, of Riga, assisted to save vessel and 4 At 4.30am on the 21st February the Albert Edward Lifeboat was launched, signals having been fired by the Swin Middle Light-vessel. The morning was bitterly cold; a very strong wind was blowing from the N.E., and the sea was very rough. Flares were afterwards seen, apparently shown by a vessel ashore on the Whitaker or Buxey Sands, and the Lifeboat burned blue-lights in response, but no further signals being shown, she proceeded to the Light-ship, were the crew were informed that a vessel was in distress bearing S.W. by W. After going some distance and seeing nothing of the vessel, the course was altered for the Maplin Light, where the same information was given. Proceeding again in the direction indicated, the Lifeboat men eventually found the schooner Dorothea, of Riga, bound from Memel for London with oak staves, and having a crew of four men, just below the West Maplin Buoy; she was full of water, and had lost her rudder. The Lifeboat men weighed the anchor, set some of thew sails, and the Lifeboat was made fast astern, so as to steer the vessel, but owing to the heavy sea a ship being waterlogged, the services of a steam-tug had also been secured. After some time, the hawsers repeatedly breaking, the vessel was got off the sand and was taken to Gravesend, which was reached at about 5 o’clock in the afternoon. The Lifeboat crew went ashore for food, having had but little since leaving home in the morning, after obtaining which they returned to the ship. The Coxswain and two men remained on board to assist in taking the vessel to London. About 1.30 on the following afternoon the Lifeboat, with eleven men, under the charge of the assistant Coxswain, started to return to her station, but owing to adverse winds, and being unable to obtain a tow from any vessel proceeding towards the Swin, the crew took refuge on board the tug Victoria until daylight, when they left the tug and were kindly taken in tow by the s.s. Columbia, of London, as far as the N.E. Gunfleet Buoy, the boat reaching Clacton Pier at 7.45pm, the crew being worn out by exposure and cold. 1888 February 27th - Steamer Blonde, of Whitehaven, assisted to save vessel and 10 On the 27th February, at 1.15pm, the Albert Edward Lifeboat put off to the assistance of the steamer Blonde, of Whitehaven, bound from Goole for London with a cargo of coal and oil, and carrying a crew of ten men, which had stranded on the Gunfleet Sands, during a N.E. wind and a moderate sea. The Lifeboat men, with the help of the crews of two small smacks, lightened the vessel by throwing some of the cargo overboard, and when the tide rose, the ship was towed off by the steam tug Harwich, which took her to London, the Lifeboat returning to station, which she reached at 2pm, after an absence of twenty-four hours. 1888 April 25th - Barque Flekkefjord, of Flekkefjord, assisted to save vessel and 12 In response to signals, the Albert Edward was launched at midnight on the 25th April, during a strong N.E. wind and a rough sea, and proceeded under double reefed sails to the Swin Middle Light-vessel, where the crew were informed that there was a vessel on the Barrow Sands. The boat at once went in that direction, and found the barque Flekkefjord, of Flekkefjord, Norway, bound from Christiansand for London with a cargo of timber, and having as crew of twelve men, stranded about a third of a mile S.S.W. of the Middle Buoy; she was full of water, and her rudder was unshipped. Preparations were made for getting the vessel afloat and when the tide rose, the steam tug Storm Cork attached her hawser, and eventually the barque was got afloat and taken to London, the Lifeboat remain astern so as to steer her as far as the Chapman Light. The Lifeboat was taken in tow by the s.s. America on her return, and arrived back at her station at about 7.70am on the 27th April. The coxswain and five of the Lifeboat men remained onboard the barque, to assist to take her to London. 1888 November 5th – 7th, Barque Minnet, of Helsingborg, saved 15 Signal having been heard, the Lifeboat, temporarily placed at Clacton-on-Sea whilst the boat belonging to the station was being altered, was launched at 3am, and proceeded to the Swin Middle Light-vessel. The Lifeboat men were informed that the signals made there were in reception of those shown from the Maplin Lightship. The Lifeboat therefore made for the Maplin Sands, and found the barque Minnet, of Helsingborg, timber laden, ashore there. Some of the Lifeboat men boarded the vessel, to make arrangements for an attempt to get her afloat, and the boat proceeded to Gravesend to procure the services of a steam tug. When the steamer arrived she was unable to get near the ship, and ultimately it became necessary to abandon vessel, as it was feared she would soon break up. Her crew of twelve men, a pilot, and two fishermen who were on board, with the crew’s baggage, were then taken aboard the Lifeboat and landed at Sheerness, the boat being taken into the dockyard, and her crew receiving most kind treatment at the hands of the Port Admiral and the authorities of the Royal Navel Barracks. The boat returned to her station at 1.15pm, on the 7th November, after an absence of fifty-eight hours, being towed part of the way by the steamers Hawk and James Southern, both of London 1890 October 3rd - Boats of Bbarque Larissa, of Blyth, saved 8 At about 6.30am on the 3rd October, 1890, the second coxswain of the Lifeboat reported to the superintendent that a barque had stranded on the S.W. Gunfleet sand, and on looking a the vessel with a telescope it was seen to be showing signals of distress. The usual sound signals were fired to summon the crew of the Lifeboat Albert Edward; the boat was launched in a rough sea, a strong gale blowing from the W.S.West, and with all possible speed sailed to the scene of the wreck. She went across the Wallet to the Gunfleet West Buoy, experiencing some difficulty in crossing the sands, the tide being low, and then proceeded down the Swin towards the stranded barque. Whilst she was making for the wreck, two boats were seen to leave and go in the direction of the Gunfleet Lighthouse, and on coming up with these boats, they were found to contain the vessel’s crew of eight men with their baggage. The men and their effects were taken into the Lifeboat, one of the ship’s boats was cut adrift, and the other being a better one, was taken in tow. A signal was then made to the steamer Albatross, of Grimsby, to tow the Lifeboat, and the master and crew very kindly did so, taking her as far as the Swin Spitway when she was cast off, after which sail was set and she returned to her station at 12 o’clock noon. Whilst in tow of the steamer the line of the ship’s boat parted, owing to the heavy sea, and the boat wass lost. The wrecked vessel was the Larissa, of Blyth, 315 tons, bound from North Shields with a cargo of coal. 1891 March 10th - Schooner J.W. Bebell, of Beaumaris, saved 1 On the morning of the 10th March news was received that a man had landed about two miles east of Clacton at eight o’clock in a open boat which was nearly full of water. He had been taken to a farmhouse by some labouring people, and stated that he had left four men on his vessel, the schooner J.W Bebell, of Beaumaris, bound from Aberdeen for London with a cargo of granite. The coxswain of the Lifeboat Albert Edward, on being apprised of the event, at once proceeded in a conveyance to the farmhouse to obtain from the man the aproximate position of the vessel. He brought the man with him in the carriage to Clacton, and handed him over to the charge of the Shipwrecked Mariners’ Society Agent. At 11.30 the Lifeboat was launched, proceeded across the Wallet and Gunfleet Sands, and was kindly taken in tow by the s.s Rosalind, of Newcastle, to about two miles below the Gunfleet Light, where the boat was slipped, sail was set, and after passing through a tremendous quantity of broken water and shipping several heavy seas, she arrived at the vessel and found two men in the main rigging. One of the men was taken into the Lifeboat; he reported the other man was dead, and the master and the cook had been washed overboard and drowned. One of the Lifeboat men ascended the rigging, cut away the lashings of the dead body, and lowered it into the boat. While this was being effected one of the boat’s crew was dragged overboard by the vessel’s rigging, but was happily rescued by his comrades. The Lifeboat then made for her station, and arrived there at 4.30pm. 1891 October 27th - Barque Oliver Cromwell, of Oland, saved 11 Signals of distress being seen, the Lifeboat Albert Edward was launched at 9.50am in a heavy sea, thick weather, and a strong gale of wind from E.S.East, and found the barque Oliver Cromwell, of Oland, ashore on the Whitaker Sand, having parted from both her anchors. The master of the vessel had left in a smack, intending to land at Brightlingsea and telegraph Harwich for a steam tug, but it could be seen from the deck of the barque that the smack had also run aground. The mate of the vessel stated that the crew would not leave the ship until all chances of saving her had vanished, although at that time she had ten feet of water in her hold, with all hands at the pumps. The Lifeboat remained by until 4pm, when the seas were making a clean breach over her, and it became necessary to leave her. The crew were with considerable difficulty taken into the Lifeboat, which then proceeded to the stranded smack, and found that part of her crew and the master of the barque had been taken off by another smack, which was lying at anchor. The Lifeboat made for the latter vessel, took the captain on board, and returned to Clacton, were all were safely landed. 1892 February 13th - Barque Saga, of Flekkefjord, saved 11 On the afternoon of the 13th February, while a moderate N.E.  wind was blowing and the sea was rough, a vessel was seen ashore on the Sunk Sand. The Lifeboat Albert Edward was launched at 5.35, and found that the stranded vessel was the barque Saga, of Flekkefjord, bound from Gothenburg for London with a cargo of firewood. At first the master declined assistance, but when the tide flowed the sea became heavy and at about 12 o’clock a portion of the vessel’s keel and some bottom planks came up alongside. The ship then filled with water and as it was evident that there was no chance of saving her the master decided to abandon her and he with his crew of ten men and their luggage were taken into the Lifeboat and brought safely ashore. 1892 February 16th - Ketch Don, of Great Yarmouth, saved vessel and 6 Signals of distress having been seen by the Middle Light Vessel on the 16th February, the Lifeboat Albert Edward was launched at 1.15am, proceeded to the Lightship and was informed that a vessel was ashore on the Maplin Sands. The Lifeboat then went to the Sands and found the ketch Don, of Great Yarmouth, stranded about three miles W.N.West of the Swin Lightship. The Lifeboat remained by her until the following tide, laid out an anchor and got the vessel afloat. The ketch had lost her rudder, and as the wind and tide were adverse, considerable difficulty was experienced with the vessel until a jury rudder had been rigged, when she was taken into the river at Burnham, the pumps being continually at work during the whole time. The Lifeboat men were engaged nearly forty-two hours in rendering this service and suffered much from the intense cold, blinding snow storms, great exertion and want of sleep. The rigging of the boat was covered with ice. 1893 November 20th, Schooner Nora, of Mandal, saved 7 and vessel No Article Found 1893 November 21st, barque Harald Haarfager, saved 11 No Article Found
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Clacton Lifeboat Station
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