CALL OUTS 2018

Sea Sickness in the Windfarm

 09/08/2018  Boat: D Class (D723) & Atlantic 85 (B863) Clacton’s RNLI volunteers assist severely sea sick and injured man aground in the Gunfleet Wind Farm. On Thursday 9 August the volunteers of Clacton RNLI were paged at approximately 4.40pm by UK Coastguard and requested to launch Clacton’s Atlantic Class lifeboat David Porter MPS. The lifeboat launched with four volunteer crew members aboard and tasked to assist a nine-metre yacht aground in the wind farm with a severely sea sick male onboard. On arrival at the wind farm the casualty yacht was located to the western end in a position were the water was so shallow the helm had to almost feel their way in close. Unable to get closer than 100 feet, and direct radio communication with the vessel saying the man had been sick nine times and had bumped their head, a crew member waded across to the vessel with a first aid kit and handheld radio. Once the crew member was on board, the lifeboat continued to seek out a route across the sandbank to get closer to the casualty vessel. The lifeboat managed to get to within fifteen feet and pass a tow line across. Once a towline was established the lifeboat began to take the strain to prevent the yacht being driven further aground. In the meantime, Clacton’s D Class had been requested to launch and assist with the transfer of the casualty to the Atlantic Class lifeboat, due to its shallow draft. Just as the D Class arrived the casualty was pulled free of the sandbank. Being the faster lifeboat the Atlantic 85 passed the tow to the D Class and took the casualty onboard and made best speed back to station, where there was an ambulance awaiting their arrival. On reaching the station the casualty was passed to the care of the paramedics (who took the man to Colchester hospital for further assessments) before returning for a female passenger who was feeling the effect of the cold. She too was brought back to the station to be checked over by the paramedics. The Atlantic Class lifeboat then relaunched for a third time to take over the tow from the D Class, and proceeded to take the casualty vessel into Brightlingsea while the D Class returned to station. After they had been given the all clear by the paramedics, a crew member drove the lady brought ashore to Brightlingsea to await the boats arrival. Later that evening at about 11pm the volunteers once again launched the D Class lifeboat. They were tasked to assist Essex Police and the Coastguard mobile unit with a female in the water at Clacton Pier. Once they were ashore in the care of Essex Police the lifeboat was stood down to return to station. The day before at 6.10pm the Volunteer crew had launched to a vessel aground near the entrance to the River Colne, which was towed into Brightlingsea. Just as they were launching Hannah Simmons arrived with a selection of vehicles that had taken part in a cruise the previous Saturday in memory of Ben Quartermaine. Hannah also had a donation of over £140 raised during the event.

Busy Week

 01/08/2018 Boat: D Class (D723) & Atlantic 85 (B863) Clacton’s RNLI volunteers were kept busy with a visit by Paul Bossier, CEO of the RNLI and three launch requests. On Wednesday 01 August the Clacton RNLI station welcomed RNLI CEO Paul Bossier, who is visiting stations along this part of the East Anglian coastline, seeing their individual needs and strengths, affording him a better understanding of the challenges faced by our volunteer crew. David Wells, Lifeboat Operations Manager at Clacton RNLI said; ‘We were able to have frank and open discussions about issues raised, which I feel has helped close the distance between the coast and HQ.’ Later that evening at 11.45pm the volunteers launched their D Class lifeboat Damarkand IV at the request of UK Coastguard to a person in the water east of Clacton Pier. Arriving on scene the crew spotted two Essex Police officers holding the casualty above the water. The female casualty was taken aboard the lifeboat while the two police officers made their own way ashore. The lifeboat returned to station where paramedics arrived and later transferred the casualty to hospital for further observations. On Friday 3 August the D Class lifeboat followed by the Atlantic Class lifeboat were launched in an early morning search for a missing person. Both lifeboats were later stood down when the missing person was located by Essex Police officers inland. The final service of the week came on Sunday 5 August lunchtime, when again at the request of UK Coastguard the volunteers launched Damarkand IV, the station’s D Class lifeboat. The crew were tasked to two people in difficulty east of Clacton Pier. On arrival it was discovered they were in the care of the Beach Patrol team. Two crew members were put ashore (one being an A&E nurse) to see if assistance was needed. At the same time the On-Call Doctors arrived who stayed with casualties until paramedics arrived, allowing the crew to return to the lifeboat. On returning to the lifeboat UK Coastguard asked them to check around the pier for anyone else that may need assistance. The lifeboat was then requested to investigate an upturned inflatable with the two occupants in the water. On arrival all was well, but some safety advice was offered. Helmsman Joff Strutt later commented; ‘The majority of inflatables are meant for the pool and not open water, if using one in the sea take extra care, try to use a lifeguarded or patrolled beach, take note of the tides and wind direction as both can easily sweep you out to sea. If this every did happen, don’t try and swim for it. Stay with the inflatable as it will help keep you afloat and easier to spot.’ On average 22 people are helped each day by lifeboat crews from one of 238 RNLI lifeboat stations covering 19,000 miles of coastline.

Diverted to Search

 26/07/2018 Boat: D Class (D723) & Atlantic 85 (B863) At 5.39pm Clacton’s Atlantic class lifeboat was launched to a yacht aground near the entrance to the River Colne. While further crew members were awaiting their return, the pagers sounded again, this time to a person in the water at Clacton Pier. Due to crew being on station Clacton’s D class was launched within two minutes with two crew members aboard. On arrival on scene there was a male holding on to a life ring that had been thrown down from the pier. Shouts from the pier indicated there was another male in the water. The D Class made a rapid search of the area indicated, but there were concerns the male that was holding on to the ring was loosing their grip. The crew pulled them aboard the lifeboat and landed them on the beach to an awaiting ambulance before returning to the search.

Yellow Wellies save Bodyboarder

 14/07/2018 Boat: D Class (D723) Clacton RNLI volunteer’s abandon charity quiz night to save bodyboarder. On Saturday 14 July, just after 9.30pm the pagers of Clacton RNLI’s volunteers sounded during a charity quiz night in aid of Clacton RNLI, as someone had been spotted clinging to a bodyboard. Clacton’s D Class lifeboat Damarkand IV was launched with three volunteer crew members at the request of UK Coastguard, two of whom had been at the quiz night. They were tasked to a bodyboarder who was struggling to pull themselves out of the water and onto their board just west of Clacton Pier. On arrival the person was pulled aboard the lifeboat, where a quick welfare assessment was made. As they reported they had swallowed a lot of water it was deemed prudent to return to the boathouse with the casualty where they could be assessed by paramedics for side effects. After a detailed assessment that showed no side effects from the intake of sea water, they were left in the care of their family. The six members of the Yellow Wellies quiz team then returned to the quiz night at the Albert Edward Hall with a good excuse for their score, while the remaining crew members made sure everything was ready for the lifeboat’s next launch. Crew member Steve Oakes who was also a member of the Yellow Wellies said; ‘It’s not often we get a call during a fundraising event, but I think it helped highlight to those in attendance how important their support is in saving lives at sea, as I feel it was another life saved tonight, which would not have been possible without their support.’ David Wells, Lifeboat Operations Manager at Clacton RNLI; ‘We had a good outcome tonight from an all too common incident that could so easily have gone the other way. I would like to stress the importance of wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid when out on the water, they will not only keep you afloat, but just as importantly reduce the risk of panic, reducing the risk of drowning.’ ‘Currently the RNLI is running a campaign ‘FLOAT TO LIVE’ which is aiming to reducing drownings by making people aware that if they fall in the water, try to resist your initial instinct to thrash around; just lean back, extend your arms and legs and float until your breathing is under control, only then try and call for help or swim. This will reduce the chance of ingesting lots of water and inevitably drowning. More details can be found at rnli.org.uk

Upturned Kayak

 23/06/2018 Boat: D Class (D723) The volunteers of Clacton RNLI rescue man clinging to an upturned kayak in their second call out of the day. At 7.40pm on Saturday 23 June, Clacton’s D Class lifeboat was launched with three volunteer crew members at the request of UK Coastguard. They were tasked to two men who had capsized their kayaks off the rock breakwaters adjacent to Jaywick Post Office. On arrival, one of the men had made it ashore and was being cared for by the coastguard mobile unit, the other man was seen still clinging to an upturned half submerged kayak. As they were not wearing a lifejacket it was imperative to pull them quickly aboard the lifeboat. As the man was suffering from the effects of exposure and immersion in the sea, it was deemed prudent by the casualty care trained crew to return to the lifeboat station with the man and transfer him to the care of the East of England Ambulance service for further assessment. The crew later returned to collect the kayak and paddle, which was handed over to the coastguard mobile unit to be reunited with its owner. Helmsman Eddie Vaughan-Chatfield said; ‘We had a good outcome today from an incident that could so easily have gone the other way. I would like to stress the importance of wearing a lifejacket for all craft, they will not only keep you afloat, but just as importantly reduce the risk of panic, reducing the risk of drowning.’ ‘Currently the RNLI is running a campaign ‘FLOAT TO LIVE’ which is aiming to reducing drownings by making people aware that if they fall in the water, try to resist your initial instinct to thrash around; just lean back, extend your arms and legs and float until your breathing is under control, only then try and call for help or swim. This will reduce the chance of ingesting lots of water and inevitably drowning. More details can be found at rnli.org.uk’ Earlier in the day the Atlantic Class lifeboat David Porter MPS was launched to a ten-metre yacht that had run aground approximately ten miles South.South.East of Clacton Pier. Once the welfare of the skipper and their yacht had been checked, the skipper was happy to wait and float off on the next high tide. With this information UK Coastguard released the lifeboat to return to station.

MAYDAY MAYDAY MAYDAY!

 19/06/2018 Boat: D Class (D723) & Atlantic 85 (B863) Clacton RNLI volunteer crews investigate mysterious ‘MAYDAY’ call At 11.10am while the volunteer crew were carrying out training scenarios, an incomplete distress call of ‘MAYDAY MAYDAY MAYDAY’ was heard over the radios, as well as by UK Coastguard, who monitor Channel 16 for distress calls. There was no further transmission and no response to the Coastguard’s replies to the call. As all calls of this nature are taken seriously by the coastguard they were able to use the distress calls signal strength to narrow down the search area and called out to other vessels in the area to ascertain what they heard, and hopefully narrow down the search area even further. With the limited information to hand the coastguard requested Clacton’s Atlantic class lifeboat David Porter MPS to search the area from Clacton Pier to the Naze tower (seven miles along the coastline to the N.East) up to approximately 0.5 miles off the shoreline. Once completed, the volunteer crew searched the Buxey Sands (four miles south of Tower holiday camp, Jaywick), again nothing was found. During this time the D Class lifeboat Hicks’ Help was searching the shoreline area towards the mouth of the River Blackwater (seven miles along the coastline to the S.West). On reaching the River Blackwater the lifeboat crossed over to the St Peters’ Flats side before returning towards their start position on a parallel track, stopping to investigate any vessel that was at anchor on route. Nothing was found to be amiss. Once the coastguard was confident the area had been comprehensively searched both lifeboats were stood down to return to station at 1.05pm, where they were washed down and prepared for the next service. Helmsman Eddie Vaughan-Chatfield said; ‘We take all distress calls seriously, no matter how vague or incomplete they are, so we would ask that anyone making one in error please send a cancel message to let everyone know you are ok.’ Mr Vaughan-Chatfield went on to say; ‘We urge anyone planning on setting out to sea to learn the correct MAYDAY procedure, as this will help insure you pass across all relevant information quickly and concisely, saving vital time in distress situation.’

Second Life Saved

 08/06/2018 Boat: D Class (D723) & Atlantic 85 (B863) Second life saved by the Clacton RNLI volunteer crew in less than a month The volunteer crew were paged just after 2.20am on Friday 8 June by UK Coastguard, and requested to launch Clacton RNLI’s D class lifeboat, to reports of someone having entered the water near the town’s iconic pier. Once launched, the volunteer crew were quickly on scene just west of Clacton Pier. With no direct communication with the Essex Police officers on the beach a crew member was put ashore with a handheld radio. The crew on the D Class completed a detailed search around the posts of the pier, while their colleague did the same from the shore, after which they returned to the lifeboat. The Essex Police officers were still in contact with the first informant, who was able to give a lot more detail to help in the search. They were able to confirm when and where the person had entered the water, as they had gone in themselves to help, but was soon getting out of their depth and returned to shore to raise the alarm. With this added information the helm was confident the person was still out there and would need assistance in locating them. He requested the launch of Clacton’s Atlantic Class lifeboat, David Porter MPS, and was informed the Essex Police helicopter was on route to assist. Due to being so close to shore radio communication with UK Coastguard was very poor, so a volunteer at Clacton’s Lifeboat Station was at the radio relaying messages throughout. After a few quick calculations to determine the most likely area and direction of travel of the casualty, due to the speed of the flooding tide, and the time that had elapsed since entering the water, the crew of Clacton’s D Class lifeboat started a search from the pier towards Martello Bay in a ‘Zig Zag’ pattern to search as much area as possible. The Atlantic Class lifeboat would do the same but starting at Martello Bay and heading towards Jaywick. Within minutes of launching the casualty was spotted with their head just above the water, approximately 30 metres from the Atlantic Class Lifeboat. Both lifeboats headed straight for the casualty whilst requesting an ambulance to rendezvous with the lifeboats and casualty at the Lifeboat Station. The volunteer crew of the Atlantic 85 extracted a female from the water and on the arrival of the D Class, quickly transferred them for a speedier recovery to the beach and the awaiting East of England Ambulance service. Once ashore, a volunteer who is also a full-time paramedic jumped aboard the lifeboat and began the initial assessments before reaching the Lifeboat Station and awaiting ambulance. After washing and rehousing the lifeboats, the volunteers of Clacton RNLI finally saw their beds again at about 4am. Helm Joff Strutt said; ‘It was a great team effort by all involved resulting in a life being saved.’ Mr Strutt went onto say; ‘The first informant did the right thing by not getting out of their depth and returning to shore to raise the alarm, as the information they gave was invaluable in locating the casualty quickly. We strongly recommend not to go in after people or pets, as too often you can get caught out and need rescuing too. Call 999 and ask for the Coastguard, and if safe to do so, stay on scene until help arrives.’

Fallen from Pier

 18/05/2018 Boat: D Class (D723) The volunteer crew were paged just after 4pm on Friday 18 May by UK Coastguard, and requested to launch Clacton RNLI’s D class lifeboat Damarkand IV, to reports of someone having fallen from the town’s iconic pier. Once launched, the volunteer crew quickly located the casualty, who was holding onto a life ring which was hanging from the pier. They were quickly pulled aboard the lifeboat, where an assessment was made of their condition while on route back to the boathouse. The casualty reported they were ok, but very cold. On reaching the beach at the lifeboat station, the crew were met by further volunteer crew members, who would help with the care of the casualty while awaiting the arrival of the ambulance and recover the lifeboat. During this period the casualty’s condition started to deteriorate quickly, with no ambulance available immediately, UK Coastguard requested rescue helicopter 163 be tasked to respond and take the person to hospital. Rescue 163 was quickly on scene, landing on the beach in front of the boathouse. Due to the casualty’s condition, volunteer crew member Hazel Johns was requested to accompany the casualty in the helicopter as she was one of the crew members administering care, and a A&E nurse (sister). Hazel is a newer member of the team, and only completed the RNLI Casualty Care course earlier this month. Even though Hazel is a fully trained A&E nurse (sister) the course allows her to understand the limitations of caring for a casualty at sea with limited resources to hand, and some of the various techniques used to mitigate them. Rescue 163 then took off from the beach and headed for Colchester Hospital where further treatment and observations could be carried out. A coastguard mobile unit had gone ahead to prepare the landing site in Colchester while the casualty was being made ready for transfer. After arriving back to Clacton with the coastguard mobile unit, Hazel said; ‘it was an amazing experience to fly in the helicopter. Having undergone the Casualty Care course, I had confidence in my fellow volunteers’ training and abilities, even though most are not from a medical background.’ Hazel then made a quick exit in order to get ready for her night shift back in the A&E department at Colchester Hospital. Volunteer Helm Adrian Rose, who earlier this year received a 20 years’ service award from the RNLI said; ‘Whoever threw the life ring down to the casualty has most likely saved their lives’ Mr Rose later went onto say; ‘This year Clacton RNLI are celebrating 140 years of continuous service, and though the nature of our calls has changed dramatically, the charities core goal of saving lives at sea hasn’t changed.’ Photos credit to Amanda Basset.

Double Shoreline Search

 08/04/2018 Boat: D Class (D723) The exceptional quiet start to 2018 for the volunteers at RNLI Clacton was interrupted at 10.15pm on Sunday 8 April with the first of two launches, resulting in a sleepless night for the volunteer crew. UK Coastguard requested the first of the night’s launches after receiving reports of a vulnerable person near the Esplanade, Holland Haven. The volunteer crew launched onto a calm sea and made best speed to start a shoreline search from Brighton Road to the sluice gates at Holland Haven. After completing a detailed search in which nothing was discovered the crew were stood down by UK Coastguard and returned to station. With the crew just making it back to their beds the pagers sounded once again, requesting the second launch of the night for the ‘D’ Class lifeboat Damarkand IV. On this occasion the information was a little vaguer, resulting in the volunteer crew searching from Jaywick Sands to Holland Haven, along with a mobile coastguard unit from Holbrook. As with the first service nothing was discovered, and the crew were stood down by UK Coastguard. After recovering the lifeboat and preparing it for service, the crew were finally able to see their beds again at 5am. Volunteer Helm Daniel Thatcher said; “With the recent very quiet spell I had to have a double take when the pager sounded. In 2016 we were launched on service 56 times, resulting in the volunteer crew spending over 340 hours at sea on service.” Mr Thatcher went on to say; “Even though the two services resulted in nothing being found, we urge anyone that sees anyone in trouble at sea, even if they are not 100% sure, to dial 999 or 112 and ask for the Coastguard. We would rather have a fruitless genuine search than not be called to someone in trouble.”

Casualty on the Beach

 26/01/2018 Boat: D Class (D723) Just after 6pm this evening the volunteer crew pagers sounded for the first time this year. Clacton's 'D' Class lifeboat was tasked by UK Coastguard to assist their Clacton based mobile unit with a casualty on the beach East of Clacton's pier. From initial reports it was feared, due to the rising tide that an extraction would have to be made via the water. Once on scene it was clear this would not be the case. With the coastguard mobile unit happy that no further assistance was required, the lifeboat was stood down by UK Coastguard, and returned to station.
SEE PREVIOUS YEARS SEE PREVIOUS YEARS

READ FULL STORY HERE READ FULL STORY HERE

CALL OUTS 2018

Sea Sickness in the

Windfarm

 09/08/2018 Boat: D Class (D723) & Atlantic 85 (B863) Clacton’s RNLI volunteers assist severely sea sick and injured man aground in the Gunfleet Wind Farm. On Thursday 9 August the volunteers of Clacton RNLI were paged at approximately 4.40pm by UK Coastguard and requested to launch Clacton’s Atlantic Class lifeboat David Porter MPS. The lifeboat launched with four volunteer crew members aboard and tasked to assist a nine-metre yacht aground in the wind farm with a severely sea sick male onboard. On arrival at the wind farm the casualty yacht was located to the western end in a position were the water was so shallow the helm had to almost feel their way in close. Unable to get closer than 100 feet, and direct radio communication with the vessel saying the man had been sick nine times and had bumped their head, a crew member waded across to the vessel with a first aid kit and handheld radio. Once the crew member was on board, the lifeboat continued to seek out a route across the sandbank to get closer to the casualty vessel. The lifeboat managed to get to within fifteen feet and pass a tow line across. Once a towline was established the lifeboat began to take the strain to prevent the yacht being driven further aground. In the meantime, Clacton’s D Class had been requested to launch and assist with the transfer of the casualty to the Atlantic Class lifeboat, due to its shallow draft. Just as the D Class arrived the casualty was pulled free of the sandbank. Being the faster lifeboat the Atlantic 85 passed the tow to the D Class and took the casualty onboard and made best speed back to station, where there was an ambulance awaiting their arrival. On reaching the station the casualty was passed to the care of the paramedics (who took the man to Colchester hospital for further assessments) before returning for a female passenger who was feeling the effect of the cold. She too was brought back to the station to be checked over by the paramedics. The Atlantic Class lifeboat then relaunched for a third time to take over the tow from the D Class, and proceeded to take the casualty vessel into Brightlingsea while the D Class returned to station. After they had been given the all clear by the paramedics, a crew member drove the lady brought ashore to Brightlingsea to await the boats arrival. Later that evening at about 11pm the volunteers once again launched the D Class lifeboat. They were tasked to assist Essex Police and the Coastguard mobile unit with a female in the water at Clacton Pier. Once they were ashore in the care of Essex Police the lifeboat was stood down to return to station. The day before at 6.10pm the Volunteer crew had launched to a vessel aground near the entrance to the River Colne, which was towed into Brightlingsea. Just as they were launching Hannah Simmons arrived with a selection of vehicles that had taken part in a cruise the previous Saturday in memory of Ben Quartermaine. Hannah also had a donation of over £140 raised during the event.

Busy Week

 01/08/2018 Boat: D Class (D723) & Atlantic 85 (B863) Clacton’s RNLI volunteers were kept busy with a visit by Paul Bossier, CEO of the RNLI and three launch requests. On Wednesday 01 August the Clacton RNLI station welcomed RNLI CEO Paul Bossier, who is visiting stations along this part of the East Anglian coastline, seeing their individual needs and strengths, affording him a better understanding of the challenges faced by our volunteer crew. David Wells, Lifeboat Operations Manager at Clacton RNLI said; ‘We were able to have frank and open discussions about issues raised, which I feel has helped close the distance between the coast and HQ.’ Later that evening at 11.45pm the volunteers launched their D Class lifeboat Damarkand IV at the request of UK Coastguard to a person in the water east of Clacton Pier. Arriving on scene the crew spotted two Essex Police officers holding the casualty above the water. The female casualty was taken aboard the lifeboat while the two police officers made their own way ashore. The lifeboat returned to station where paramedics arrived and later transferred the casualty to hospital for further observations. On Friday 3 August the D Class lifeboat followed by the Atlantic Class lifeboat were launched in an early morning search for a missing person. Both lifeboats were later stood down when the missing person was located by Essex Police officers inland. The final service of the week came on Sunday 5 August lunchtime, when again at the request of UK Coastguard the volunteers launched Damarkand IV, the station’s D Class lifeboat. The crew were tasked to two people in difficulty east of Clacton Pier. On arrival it was discovered they were in the care of the Beach Patrol team. Two crew members were put ashore (one being an A&E nurse) to see if assistance was needed. At the same time the On-Call Doctors arrived who stayed with casualties until paramedics arrived, allowing the crew to return to the lifeboat. On returning to the lifeboat UK Coastguard asked them to check around the pier for anyone else that may need assistance. The lifeboat was then requested to investigate an upturned inflatable with the two occupants in the water. On arrival all was well, but some safety advice was offered. Helmsman Joff Strutt later commented; ‘The majority of inflatables are meant for the pool and not open water, if using one in the sea take extra care, try to use a lifeguarded or patrolled beach, take note of the tides and wind direction as both can easily sweep you out to sea. If this every did happen, don’t try and swim for it. Stay with the inflatable as it will help keep you afloat and easier to spot.’ On average 22 people are helped each day by lifeboat crews from one of 238 RNLI lifeboat stations covering 19,000 miles of coastline.

Diverted to Search

 26/07/2018 Boat: D Class (D723) & Atlantic 85 (B863) At 5.39pm Clacton’s Atlantic class lifeboat was launched to a yacht aground near the entrance to the River Colne. While further crew members were awaiting their return, the pagers sounded again, this time to a person in the water at Clacton Pier. Due to crew being on station Clacton’s D class was launched within two minutes with two crew members aboard. On arrival on scene there was a male holding on to a life ring that had been thrown down from the pier. Shouts from the pier indicated there was another male in the water. The D Class made a rapid search of the area indicated, but there were concerns the male that was holding on to the ring was loosing their grip. The crew pulled them aboard the lifeboat and landed them on the beach to an awaiting ambulance before returning to the search.

Yellow Wellies save

Bodyboarder

 14/07/2018 Boat: D Class (D723) Clacton RNLI volunteer’s abandon charity quiz night to save bodyboarder. On Saturday 14 July, just after 9.30pm the pagers of Clacton RNLI’s volunteers sounded during a charity quiz night in aid of Clacton RNLI, as someone had been spotted clinging to a bodyboard. Clacton’s D Class lifeboat Damarkand IV was launched with three volunteer crew members at the request of UK Coastguard, two of whom had been at the quiz night. They were tasked to a bodyboarder who was struggling to pull themselves out of the water and onto their board just west of Clacton Pier. On arrival the person was pulled aboard the lifeboat, where a quick welfare assessment was made. As they reported they had swallowed a lot of water it was deemed prudent to return to the boathouse with the casualty where they could be assessed by paramedics for side effects. After a detailed assessment that showed no side effects from the intake of sea water, they were left in the care of their family. The six members of the Yellow Wellies quiz team then returned to the quiz night at the Albert Edward Hall with a good excuse for their score, while the remaining crew members made sure everything was ready for the lifeboat’s next launch. Crew member Steve Oakes who was also a member of the Yellow Wellies said; ‘It’s not often we get a call during a fundraising event, but I think it helped highlight to those in attendance how important their support is in saving lives at sea, as I feel it was another life saved tonight, which would not have been possible without their support.’ David Wells, Lifeboat Operations Manager at Clacton RNLI; ‘We had a good outcome tonight from an all too common incident that could so easily have gone the other way. I would like to stress the importance of wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid when out on the water, they will not only keep you afloat, but just as importantly reduce the risk of panic, reducing the risk of drowning.’ ‘Currently the RNLI is running a campaign ‘FLOAT TO LIVE’ which is aiming to reducing drownings by making people aware that if they fall in the water, try to resist your initial instinct to thrash around; just lean back, extend your arms and legs and float until your breathing is under control, only then try and call for help or swim. This will reduce the chance of ingesting lots of water and inevitably drowning. More details can be found at rnli.org.uk

Upturned Kayak

 23/06/2018 Boat: D Class (D723) The volunteers of Clacton RNLI rescue man clinging to an upturned kayak in their second call out of the day. At 7.40pm on Saturday 23 June, Clacton’s D Class lifeboat was launched with three volunteer crew members at the request of UK Coastguard. They were tasked to two men who had capsized their kayaks off the rock breakwaters adjacent to Jaywick Post Office. On arrival, one of the men had made it ashore and was being cared for by the coastguard mobile unit, the other man was seen still clinging to an upturned half submerged kayak. As they were not wearing a lifejacket it was imperative to pull them quickly aboard the lifeboat. As the man was suffering from the effects of exposure and immersion in the sea, it was deemed prudent by the casualty care trained crew to return to the lifeboat station with the man and transfer him to the care of the East of England Ambulance service for further assessment. The crew later returned to collect the kayak and paddle, which was handed over to the coastguard mobile unit to be reunited with its owner. Helmsman Eddie Vaughan-Chatfield said; ‘We had a good outcome today from an incident that could so easily have gone the other way. I would like to stress the importance of wearing a lifejacket for all craft, they will not only keep you afloat, but just as importantly reduce the risk of panic, reducing the risk of drowning.’ ‘Currently the RNLI is running a campaign ‘FLOAT TO LIVE’ which is aiming to reducing drownings by making people aware that if they fall in the water, try to resist your initial instinct to thrash around; just lean back, extend your arms and legs and float until your breathing is under control, only then try and call for help or swim. This will reduce the chance of ingesting lots of water and inevitably drowning. More details can be found at rnli.org.uk’ Earlier in the day the Atlantic Class lifeboat David Porter MPS was launched to a ten-metre yacht that had run aground approximately ten miles South.South.East of Clacton Pier. Once the welfare of the skipper and their yacht had been checked, the skipper was happy to wait and float off on the next high tide. With this information UK Coastguard released the lifeboat to return to station.

MAYDAY MAYDAY

MAYDAY!

 18/06/2018 Boat: D Class (D723) & Atlantic 85 (B863) Clacton RNLI volunteer crews investigate mysterious ‘MAYDAY’ call At 11.10am while the volunteer crew were carrying out training scenarios, an incomplete distress call of ‘MAYDAY MAYDAY MAYDAY’ was heard over the radios, as well as by UK Coastguard, who monitor Channel 16 for distress calls. There was no further transmission and no response to the Coastguard’s replies to the call. As all calls of this nature are taken seriously by the coastguard they were able to use the distress calls signal strength to narrow down the search area and called out to other vessels in the area to ascertain what they heard, and hopefully narrow down the search area even further. With the limited information to hand the coastguard requested Clacton’s Atlantic class lifeboat David Porter MPS to search the area from Clacton Pier to the Naze tower (seven miles along the coastline to the N.East) up to approximately 0.5 miles off the shoreline. Once completed, the volunteer crew searched the Buxey Sands (four miles south of Tower holiday camp, Jaywick), again nothing was found. During this time the D Class lifeboat Hicks’ Help was searching the shoreline area towards the mouth of the River Blackwater (seven miles along the coastline to the S.West). On reaching the River Blackwater the lifeboat crossed over to the St Peters’ Flats side before returning towards their start position on a parallel track, stopping to investigate any vessel that was at anchor on route. Nothing was found to be amiss. Once the coastguard was confident the area had been comprehensively searched both lifeboats were stood down to return to station at 1.05pm, where they were washed down and prepared for the next service. Helmsman Eddie Vaughan-Chatfield said; ‘We take all distress calls seriously, no matter how vague or incomplete they are, so we would ask that anyone making one in error please send a cancel message to let everyone know you are ok.’ Mr Vaughan-Chatfield went on to say; ‘We urge anyone planning on setting out to sea to learn the correct MAYDAY procedure, as this will help insure you pass across all relevant information quickly and concisely, saving vital time in distress situation.’

Second Life Saved

 08/06/2018 Boat: D Class (D723) & Atlantic 85 (B863) Second life saved by the Clacton RNLI volunteer crew in less than a month The volunteer crew were paged just after 2.20am on Friday 8 June by UK Coastguard, and requested to launch Clacton RNLI’s D class lifeboat, to reports of someone having entered the water near the town’s iconic pier. Once launched, the volunteer crew were quickly on scene just west of Clacton Pier. With no direct communication with the Essex Police officers on the beach a crew member was put ashore with a handheld radio. The crew on the D Class completed a detailed search around the posts of the pier, while their colleague did the same from the shore, after which they returned to the lifeboat. The Essex Police officers were still in contact with the first informant, who was able to give a lot more detail to help in the search. They were able to confirm when and where the person had entered the water, as they had gone in themselves to help, but was soon getting out of their depth and returned to shore to raise the alarm. With this added information the helm was confident the person was still out there and would need assistance in locating them. He requested the launch of Clacton’s Atlantic Class lifeboat, David Porter MPS, and was informed the Essex Police helicopter was on route to assist. Due to being so close to shore radio communication with UK Coastguard was very poor, so a volunteer at Clacton’s Lifeboat Station was at the radio relaying messages throughout. After a few quick calculations to determine the most likely area and direction of travel of the casualty, due to the speed of the flooding tide, and the time that had elapsed since entering the water, the crew of Clacton’s D Class lifeboat started a search from the pier towards Martello Bay in a ‘Zig Zag’ pattern to search as much area as possible. The Atlantic Class lifeboat would do the same but starting at Martello Bay and heading towards Jaywick. Within minutes of launching the casualty was spotted with their head just above the water, approximately 30 metres from the Atlantic Class Lifeboat. Both lifeboats headed straight for the casualty whilst requesting an ambulance to rendezvous with the lifeboats and casualty at the Lifeboat Station. The volunteer crew of the Atlantic 85 extracted a female from the water and on the arrival of the D Class, quickly transferred them for a speedier recovery to the beach and the awaiting East of England Ambulance service. Once ashore, a volunteer who is also a full-time paramedic jumped aboard the lifeboat and began the initial assessments before reaching the Lifeboat Station and awaiting ambulance. After washing and rehousing the lifeboats, the volunteers of Clacton RNLI finally saw their beds again at about 4am. Helm Joff Strutt said; ‘It was a great team effort by all involved resulting in a life being saved.’ Mr Strutt went onto say; ‘The first informant did the right thing by not getting out of their depth and returning to shore to raise the alarm, as the information they gave was invaluable in locating the casualty quickly. We strongly recommend not to go in after people or pets, as too often you can get caught out and need rescuing too. Call 999 and ask for the Coastguard, and if safe to do so, stay on scene until help arrives.’

Fallen from Pier

 18/05/2018 Boat: D Class (D723) The volunteer crew were paged just after 4pm on Friday 18 May by UK Coastguard, and requested to launch Clacton RNLI’s D class lifeboat Damarkand IV, to reports of someone having fallen from the town’s iconic pier. Once launched, the volunteer crew quickly located the casualty, who was holding onto a life ring which was hanging from the pier. They were quickly pulled aboard the lifeboat, where an assessment was made of their condition while on route back to the boathouse. The casualty reported they were ok, but very cold. On reaching the beach at the lifeboat station, the crew were met by further volunteer crew members, who would help with the care of the casualty while awaiting the arrival of the ambulance and recover the lifeboat. During this period the casualty’s condition started to deteriorate quickly, with no ambulance available immediately, UK Coastguard requested rescue helicopter 163 be tasked to respond and take the person to hospital. Rescue 163 was quickly on scene, landing on the beach in front of the boathouse. Due to the casualty’s condition, volunteer crew member Hazel Johns was requested to accompany the casualty in the helicopter as she was one of the crew members administering care, and a A&E nurse (sister). Hazel is a newer member of the team, and only completed the RNLI Casualty Care course earlier this month. Even though Hazel is a fully trained A&E nurse (sister) the course allows her to understand the limitations of caring for a casualty at sea with limited resources to hand, and some of the various techniques used to mitigate them. Rescue 163 then took off from the beach and headed for Colchester Hospital where further treatment and observations could be carried out. A coastguard mobile unit had gone ahead to prepare the landing site in Colchester while the casualty was being made ready for transfer. After arriving back to Clacton with the coastguard mobile unit, Hazel said; ‘it was an amazing experience to fly in the helicopter. Having undergone the Casualty Care course, I had confidence in my fellow volunteers’ training and abilities, even though most are not from a medical background.’ Hazel then made a quick exit in order to get ready for her night shift back in the A&E department at Colchester Hospital. Volunteer Helm Adrian Rose, who earlier this year received a 20 years’ service award from the RNLI said; ‘Whoever threw the life ring down to the casualty has most likely saved their lives’ Mr Rose later went onto say; ‘This year Clacton RNLI are celebrating 140 years of continuous service, and though the nature of our calls has changed dramatically, the charities core goal of saving lives at sea hasn’t changed.’ Photos credit to Amanda Basset.

Double Shoreline

Search

 08/04/2018 Boat: D Class (D723) The exceptional quiet start to 2018 for the volunteers at RNLI Clacton was interrupted at 10.15pm on Sunday 8 April with the first of two launches, resulting in a sleepless night for the volunteer crew. UK Coastguard requested the first of the night’s launches after receiving reports of a vulnerable person near the Esplanade, Holland Haven. The volunteer crew launched onto a calm sea and made best speed to start a shoreline search from Brighton Road to the sluice gates at Holland Haven. After completing a detailed search in which nothing was discovered the crew were stood down by UK Coastguard and returned to station. With the crew just making it back to their beds the pagers sounded once again, requesting the second launch of the night for the ‘D’ Class lifeboat Damarkand IV. On this occasion the information was a little vaguer, resulting in the volunteer crew searching from Jaywick Sands to Holland Haven, along with a mobile coastguard unit from Holbrook. As with the first service nothing was discovered, and the crew were stood down by UK Coastguard. After recovering the lifeboat and preparing it for service, the crew were finally able to see their beds again at 5am. Volunteer Helm Daniel Thatcher said; “With the recent very quiet spell I had to have a double take when the pager sounded. In 2016 we were launched on service 56 times, resulting in the volunteer crew spending over 340 hours at sea on service.” Mr Thatcher went on to say; “Even though the two services resulted in nothing being found, we urge anyone that sees anyone in trouble at sea, even if they are not 100% sure, to dial 999 or 112 and ask for the Coastguard. We would rather have a fruitless genuine search than not be called to someone in trouble.”

Casualty on the

Beach

 26/01/2018 Boat: D Class (D723) Just after 6pm this evening the volunteer crew pagers sounded for the first time this year. Clacton's 'D' Class lifeboat was tasked by UK Coastguard to assist their Clacton based mobile unit with a casualty on the beach East of Clacton's pier. From initial reports it was feared, due to the rising tide that an extraction would have to be made via the water. Once on scene it was clear this would not be the case. With the coastguard mobile unit happy that no further assistance was required, the lifeboat was stood down by UK Coastguard, and returned to station.
SEE PREVIOUS YEARS SEE PREVIOUS YEARS
READ FULL STORY HERE READ FULL STORY HERE
Clacton Lifeboat Station
Clacton Lifeboat Station
MENU